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Bollylingual: 15 Bollywood Songs That Blend Languages in Their Lyrics

bollywood songs

Bollywood songs have always been an integral part of Indian culture, with their melodious tunes and heart-touching lyrics. Over the years, Language in Bollywood songs have evolved, incorporating the other changes.

Moreover, miixing regional languages with Hindi or English has become a popular trend, resulting in some of the most memorable and foot-tapping numbers.

In this blog, we have compiled a list of 15 Bollywood songs that have effectively blended different languages in their lyrics, including Jiya Jale, Locha-e-Ulfat, and others.

Let’s dive into the world of language in Bollywood songs and explore the magic of these multilingual tracks

Song List
1. Jiya Jale
2. Locha-e-Ulfat
3. O Womaniya
4. I Hate Luv Storys
5. Banno
6. Radha
7. D.K Bose
8. Monta Re
9. Galti Se Mistake
10. Kamli
11. London Thumakda
12. Mere Dholna
13. Navrai Majhi
14. Shubhaarambh
15. Tune Maari Entriyaan

Ever since its teaser release, the first song ‘Kesariya’ from Ayan Mukerji’s hit 2022 movie ‘Brahmastra’ has been creating a buzz. While the major portion is sung in Hindi, it features a line where two English words “Love Storiyan” are included. Although this addition of English words seems to be out of place and does not blend well with the otherwise seamless track, it is enjoyed and appreciated by the listeners.

1. Jiya Jale

The Bollywood song “Jiya Jale” from the movie Dil Se is a classic example of language mixing in music. The song features lyrics in both Hindi and Tamil languages, with the former being the primary language.

The Tamil portions are seamlessly blended into the song, adding a unique and melodious touch to the overall composition. The fusion of regional languages in “Jiya Jale” makes it a timeless hit song loved by music enthusiasts even today.

The Tamil lyrics incorporated in the song are as:

“Punjirithanji konjikko

Munthiri muththoli chindhikko

Vanjani varna chundhari vaavae

Thaanginnakkath thakadhimiyaadum thanganilaavae hoi”

2. Locha-e-Ulfat

One of the acclaimed Bollywood songs featuring Alia Bhatt is from her 2014 film “2 States”. Titled “Locha-E-Ulfat”, the song is not only a masterpiece of Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrical prowess but also Benny Dayal’s vocal talent.

What sets this Bollywood song apart is its language. The clever use of English phrases like “comedy”, “tragedy”, “simple”, and “fine” is seamlessly woven into the lyrics, which gives it a conversational tone, like a friend confiding about a crush in everyday language.

The title of the song itself is a combination of regional languages Urdu and Marathi, with “Locha” being Marathi for “problem” and “Ulfat” translating to “of love” in Urdu.

“Yeh comedy hai, Ya tragedy hai

Na hona tha kyun ho gaya…

[Hook]

Locha-E… Locha-E…

Locha-E-Ulfat ho gaya

Locha-E-Ulfat ho gaya”

3. O Womaniya

One of the standout Bollywood songs from the movie “Gangs of Wasseypur” is this excellently written track by Varun Grover. Not only does every track in the film, including “Chi Cha Leather”, but this song also features a language blend of Bhojpuri, Hindi, and English words.

The clever mix of languages in the song has resulted in the creation of the euphemism “Womaniya”, which adds to the song’s memorability factor.

“Ho womaniya, Aa ha womaniya

Hey womaniya, Oho womaniya

Yi hai womaniya, Yi hai womaniya

Ho womaniya,Aa ha womaniya

Bolega baguna.., chal raiho patna”

4. I Hate Luv Storys

The initial verse and catchy hook of the song “I Hate Luv Storys” are in English, while the remaining part of the song is in Hindi. The song portrays a flirtatious conversation of a non-committal Casanova with a woman he is interested in.

In addition to this, many other Bollywood songs feature phrases and entire verses in different languages Arabic, Urdu, English, and Punjabi are the most common languages used.

“I know you like me

You know I like you

Lets get together girl

You know you want to

Raat din aate jaate

Hoti hai. sau mulaquatein

Aage badti hai baatein

Peeche chhod de

Raaste mein hai thehre

Aur bhi kitne chehre”

5. Banno

Tanu Weds Manu Returns, a classic movie featuring Kangana Ranaut, garnered critical acclaim and commercial success owing to its captivating storyline, performances, and soundtrack.

One of the standout songs from the film is “Banno”, which is also a lively and delightful blend of regional languages Haryanvi, Hindi, and English words. With the use of slang like “swagger” and words like “sexy” and “backseat” seamlessly integrated with Haryanvi and Hindi lines, the song sets a fun and vibrant tone.

“Garm hawa di udi gubaari

Family de haath ni aari

Jugni dugni chamak chingari

Monsoon se halki bhaari

Warning public mein jaari

Aap sambhaalo jimmedari..

Baat-vaat kardi ai

Haath-vaath maardi ai

Bethe kabhi na back-seat

Banno tera swagger laage sexy

Banno tera swagger…”

6. Radha

The song “Radha” from the movie “Student of the Year” is a catchy and upbeat track that features a mix of Hindi and English lyrics. Although the song’s opening verse is in English, it is followed by Hindi lyrics with sprinkles of English phrases throughout.

The use of phrases like “dance floor”, “likes to party”, and “moves that” in the lyrics, adds to the fun and playful vibe of the song. The use of a mixture of languages in the Bollywood song blends with the film’s contemporary theme and youthful energy.

“Gopiyon sang ghoome Kanhaiya

Raas rachaiya Ragha na jaaye re

Abb saanwra na bhaaye re

Radha on the dance floor

Radha likes to party

Radha likes to move that desi (sexy) Radha body”

7. D.K Bose

“D. K. Bose” from the Bollywood movie “Delhi Belly” is a song that features a blend of Hindi and English lyrics, with a catchy and energetic beat. The song looks like a parody of “Papa kehte hain bada naam karega”, a song featuring Aamir Khan.

The lyrics are predominantly in Hindi, but the song’s chorus features the English phrase “D.K. Bose, D.K Bose”. The use of a mix of Hindi and English words adds to the song’s irreverent and rebellious tone, making it a popular choice for party playlists.

“Daddy mujhse bola, Tu galati hai meri

Tujhpe Zindagani guilty hai meri

Saabun ki Shaqal mein, beta tu toh nikla keval jhaag

Jhaag jhaag…

Bhaag >>>

Bhaag bhaag……”

8. Monta Re

The song “Monta Re” from the movie “Lootera” is a beautiful and soulful track that features a mix of Hindi and Bengali lyrics. The song’s opening verse is in Bengali, followed by Hindi lyrics with occasional Bengali phrases throughout.

The use of both languages adds to this Bollywood song, an emotional depth and connects with a wider audience. The lyrics are poetic and heartfelt, describing the joys and pains of love. The blend of Hindi and Bengali words adds to the song’s timeless quality and continues to resonate with listeners:

“Kaagaz ke do pankh leke uda chala jaaye re

Jahan nahi jaana tha ye wahin chala haye re

Umar ka yeh taana-baana samajh na paaye re

Zubaan pe jo moh-maaya, namak lagaye re

Ke dekhe na, bhaale na, jaane na daaye re

Disha haara kemon boka monta re!

Disha haara kemon boka monta re”

9. Galti Se Mistake

“Galti Se Mistake” from the Bollywood movie “Jagga Jasoos” is a catchy and upbeat song that features a mix of Hindi and Punjabi lyrics. The song’s opening verse is in Hindi, also followed by Punjabi lyrics in the chorus with occasional English phrases throughout.

“Jhatka zara sa mehsoos hua ek

Life ki gaadi ne kass ke maara brake

Ho raha hai kyun confuse mere dil

Mashwara mera tu aazma ke dekh

Ye hi umar hai karle

Galti se mistake”

10. Kamli

“Kamli” from the movie “Dhoom 3” is a high-energy dance number that features a mix of Hindi and Punjabi lyrics.

The use of both languages adds to the song’s catchy and vibrant nature, making it a popular choice for dance performances.

“Main ruthiya yaar manawangi

Har chilman phoonk jalawangi

Jad patthar Ranjha pighlega

Tad main Kamli kehlawangi”

11. London Thumakda

“London Thumakda” from the movie “Queen” is a lively wedding song that blends Hindi and Punjabi lyrics with occasional English phrases.

The use of Punjabi words and phrases like “thumakda” and “munde di” adds a fun and energetic vibe to the song. The song also includes English words such as “beat” and “drama” which further enhances its fusion of languages.

“Tu ho gayi one to two

Oh kudiye what to do

Oh ho gayi munde di

Tu turu turu turu”

12. Mere Dholna

“Mere Dholna” from the movie “Bhool Bhulaiyaa” is a beautiful blend of Hindi and classical Bengali. The song starts with the line “Aami Je Tomar, Shudhu Je Tomar, Mere dholna, sunn mera dholna” which translates to “My beloved, listen to me, my beloved”.

The use of the word “dholna” which is a Punjabi word, moreover, it adds a regional touch to the song. The song’s mixture of languages and genres makes it a timeless classic.

“Aami Je Tomar

Shudhu Je Tomar

Mere dholna sun mere

pyaar ki dhun mere dholna sun

meri chaahatein toh fiza mein

bahengi zinda rahengi hoke fanaa

ta na na na tum”

13. Navrai Majhi

“Navrai Majhi” from the movie “English Vinglish” is a joyful mix of Marathi, Hindi, and English. The song starts with the line “Navrai majhi ladachi ladachi ga” which means “My bride, dance joyfully”. The use of Marathi words such as “Navrai” and “ladachi” gives the song a cultural touch.

“Navrai majhi laadachi laadachi ga

Avad hila chandrachi chandrachi ga

Navrai majhi navsaachee navsaachee ga

Apsara jashi indrachi indrachi ga

Navrai chali sharmaati ghabraati woh

Piya ke ghar ithlaati balkhaati woh,

Surmai naina chalkaati chalkaati woh,

Piya ke ghar bharmaati, sakuchati woh!”

14. Shubhaarambh

“Shubhaarambh” from the movie “Kai Po Che” is a celebratory song that mixes Gujarati and Hindi languages in its lyrics. The opening lines “Ho.. Aye.. Haa.. Haalo.. Shubhaarambh” in Gujarati means “Come, let’s start the good beginning”.

The mixture of both languages reflects the rich culture of Gujarat and adds to the festive mood of the song. The song’s foot-tapping beats and language mix make it a popular choice for any celebratory occasion.

“Rangi par ud aavee, Khushiyon sang laavee

Harkhaye haiyo haaye.. Haaye..

Aasha ni kirano bikhraaye

Umange vi chhalkaaye

Man halvethi gungunaaye

Haaye, haaye, haaye, haaye..

Hey shubhaarambh

Ho Shubhaarambh

Mangal bela aayi

Sapnon ki dehri pe

Dil ki baaji re shehnai”

15. Tune Maari Entriyaan

“Tune Maari Entriyaan” is a lively and energetic song that combines Hindi, Punjabi, and English lyrics. The chorus of the song is in Punjabi, and Bengali and is repeated multiple times throughout the song.

The opening lines are in Bengali and Hindi. The song also features a mix of traditional and modern Punjabi instruments.

“Oh shona, Oh shona…

Oh shonduri..

Tomar monta diye jao

Tara tari eshe jao

Tomar monta diye jao

Tara tari eshe jao

Bengali word’s meaning:

(Shonduri: Sundari; Monta: Dil; Tara tari: taada taadi)

Tang tang tang…

Tune maari entriyaan re

Dil mein baji ghantiyaan re”

Conclusion

Bollywood songs have come a long way from being just a source of entertainment to becoming a reflection of India’s diverse cultural heritage. The incorporation of different languages in Bollywood songs not only adds to their popularity but also brings together people from different regions and backgrounds.

As we continue to embrace this trend, we can look forward to more such soulful and harmonious melodies that transcend language barriers and connect us all.

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